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後白河上皇
The Ex-Emperor Goshirakawa
(1127-93)


梁塵秘抄
The Ryōjin Hishō
(w/ Arthur Waley's translations)

朝日新聞社・日本の古典全書版『梁塵秘抄』(1962年)の解説(校閲・注釈者 小西甚一) でアーサー・ウェイリーが、勅撰『梁塵秘抄』の数百首のうち14首の翻訳を、「Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society誌」 (1921年4月号) に発表したとあり、これら数首の訳が引用されている。
In the foreword to the hardbook edition of the imperial anthology of poems, the Ryōjin Hishō (Asahi Shimbun, Japanese Classics Library) 1962), the editor/annotator Jin'ichi Konishi explains that 14 of the few hundred-odd poems were translated by the reknowned Arthur D. Waley in the Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, April 1921. Of these, he transcribed several, which I have redacted here.

#339
我を頼めて來ぬ男、角三つ生ひたる鬼になれ。
さて人に疎まれよ。霜雪霰ふる水田の鳥となれ。
さて足冷たかれ。池の萍(うき
 くさ
)となりねかし。
と搖りかうれ搖られ歩()け。
May he that bade me trust him, but did not come,
Turn into a demon with three horns on his head,
That all men fly from him!
May he become a bird of the waterfields
Where frost, snow, and hail fall,
That his feet may be frozen to ice!
Oh may he become a weed afloat on the pond!
May he trembling of the hare, with the trembling of the doe!
#342
 
美女うちみれば、一本葛(ひともと
かづら
)ともなりなばやとぞ
思ふ。本より末まで縒()らればや。切るとも刻むと
も、離れ難きは我が宿世(すく
)。
When I look at my lovely lady,
"Oh that I might become a clinging vine," I yearn,
"That from toe to tip I might be twined about her."
Then though they should crave --
Inseparable our lots!
#459
 
我が戀は、一昨日(をと
 とひ
)みえず昨日こず、
今日おとずれなくは、明日の徒然(つれ
 づれ
)如何にせん。
As for my love --
Yesterday he came not, nor the day before was seen.
If to-day there is no news
With to-morrow's idle hours
Oh what shall I do?
#468
 
山伏の腰に着けたる法螺貝の
丁(ちょう)と落ち
ていと割れ、
碎けてものを思ふ頃かな。
The conch-shell fastened at the pilgrim's thigh,
The pilgrim mountain-faring --
With a chô it has fallen,
With a tei it has cracked:
Even so my heart is shattered
By this torment of love.
#359
 
遊びをせんとや生まれけむ、
戯れせんとや生まれけん。
遊ぶ子供の聲きけば、
わが身さへこそゆるがるれ。
For sport and play
I think that we are born;
For jesting and laughter
I doubt not we are born.
For when I hear
The voice of children at their play,
My limbs, even my
Stiff limbs, are stirred.
#408
 
舞へ舞へ蝸牛。舞はぬものならば、
馬の子や牛の子に蹴させてん、
踏みわらせてん。
まことに美しく舞うたらば、
華の園まで遊ばせん。
Dance, dance, Mr. Snail!
If you won't I shall leave you
For the little horse,
For the little ox
To tread under his hoof,
To trample to bits.
But if quite prettily
You dance your dance,
To a garden of flowers
I will carry you to play.

[There is a modern Tokyo children's song which begins Mai, mai tsuburo!
But like most modern snail-songs it ends with and appeal to the animal to put out its horns.]


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